If Patriots Win the Super Bowl, the Resulting Championship Rings Will Likely Be the Biggest and Blingiest Ever

If the New England Patriots defeat the Atlanta Falcons to win their fifth Super Bowl this Sunday at NRG Stadium in Houston, the resulting championship rings are likely to be the biggest and blingiest ever.

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The National Football League seems to maintain an unwritten rule that allows teams with multiple Super Bowl victories to design the most extravagant rings. The sky will be the limit if the coveted Lombardi Trophy returns to Foxborough, Mass., in 2017. The rings are usually distributed to the winning team some time in June.

In 2015, QB Tom Brady and the Patriots celebrated their fourth Super Bowl victory with stunning rings that weighed more than a quarter-pound and gleamed with 205 diamonds. At the time, the Super Bowl XLIX Championship rings were billed as the biggest ever. Each ring boasted a minimum diamond total weight of 4.85 carats and was valued at $36,500.

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“I have been blessed to host four Super Bowl ring ceremonies, and just like the rings we present, we have tried to make each ceremony a little bigger and a little better than the one before,” Patriots’ owner Robert Kraft said at the time.

Ring manufacturer Jostens didn’t officially announce the gram weight of the 2015 Super Bowl rings, but they were far larger than the Patriots’ 2004 rings, which reportedly weighed 110 grams (just under one-quarter pound).

By comparison, when the Seattle Seahawks earned their very first Lombardi Trophy in 2014, the rings weighed in at a modest 56 grams, one of the smallest in recent Super Bowl history.

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Jostens provided a photo reflecting the Patriots’ ever-growing Super Bowl rings. In 2001, the team’s first Super Bowl ring weighed in at 74 grams. Two years later, the Patriots’ second Super Bowl ring weighed 100 grams.

In 2013, the Baltimore Ravens’ official website stated that the team’s Super Bowl XLVII championship rings weighed 380 grams (13.4 ounces), which we’re pretty sure is an error because that would have made them about three times as heavy as the massive rings awarded to the Patriots in 2015.

The NFL typically awards 150 rings to the Super Bowl victor and allocates approximately $7,000 per ring — although teams with multiple Super Bowl victories are allotted a higher budget for diamonds. Teams often create “B” and “C” level rings — designs with faux diamonds or fewer diamonds — for distribution to the front office staff.

Although the Patriots will be shooting for their fifth Super Bowl title, the record for the most Super Bowl wins is held by the Pittsburgh Steelers, who have six. The Dallas Cowboys and the San Francisco 49ers each have won five.

Credits: Photos courtesy of Jostens, Twitter/New England Patriots.

If Patriots Win the Super Bowl, the Resulting Championship Rings Will Likely Be the Biggest and Blingiest Ever

If the New England Patriots defeat the Atlanta Falcons to win their fifth Super Bowl this Sunday at NRG Stadium in Houston, the resulting championship rings are likely to be the biggest and blingiest ever.

superbowl1

The National Football League seems to maintain an unwritten rule that allows teams with multiple Super Bowl victories to design the most extravagant rings. The sky will be the limit if the coveted Lombardi Trophy returns to Foxborough, Mass., in 2017. The rings are usually distributed to the winning team some time in June.

In 2015, QB Tom Brady and the Patriots celebrated their fourth Super Bowl victory with stunning rings that weighed more than a quarter-pound and gleamed with 205 diamonds. At the time, the Super Bowl XLIX Championship rings were billed as the biggest ever. Each ring boasted a minimum diamond total weight of 4.85 carats and was valued at $36,500.

superbowl2

“I have been blessed to host four Super Bowl ring ceremonies, and just like the rings we present, we have tried to make each ceremony a little bigger and a little better than the one before,” Patriots’ owner Robert Kraft said at the time.

Ring manufacturer Jostens didn’t officially announce the gram weight of the 2015 Super Bowl rings, but they were far larger than the Patriots’ 2004 rings, which reportedly weighed 110 grams (just under one-quarter pound).

By comparison, when the Seattle Seahawks earned their very first Lombardi Trophy in 2014, the rings weighed in at a modest 56 grams, one of the smallest in recent Super Bowl history.

superbowl3

Jostens provided a photo reflecting the Patriots’ ever-growing Super Bowl rings. In 2001, the team’s first Super Bowl ring weighed in at 74 grams. Two years later, the Patriots’ second Super Bowl ring weighed 100 grams.

In 2013, the Baltimore Ravens’ official website stated that the team’s Super Bowl XLVII championship rings weighed 380 grams (13.4 ounces), which we’re pretty sure is an error because that would have made them about three times as heavy as the massive rings awarded to the Patriots in 2015.

The NFL typically awards 150 rings to the Super Bowl victor and allocates approximately $7,000 per ring — although teams with multiple Super Bowl victories are allotted a higher budget for diamonds. Teams often create “B” and “C” level rings — designs with faux diamonds or fewer diamonds — for distribution to the front office staff.

Although the Patriots will be shooting for their fifth Super Bowl title, the record for the most Super Bowl wins is held by the Pittsburgh Steelers, who have six. The Dallas Cowboys and the San Francisco 49ers each have won five.

Credits: Photos courtesy of Jostens, Twitter/New England Patriots.

NYC Man Gets Wedding Band Back One Week After Watching It Roll Through a Sidewalk Grate

A New York City man, who helplessly watched as his beloved gold wedding band fell off his finger and rolled in “slow-motion” through a sidewalk grate, got it back one week later with the help of a NYC utility company.

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There are 39,000 sidewalk grates citywide and each one can strike fear into the heart of an average pedestrian. Unlike Marilyn Monroe, who famously stood on a sidewalk grate in the 1955 film The Seven Year Itch and relished the rush of air as a subway passed below, many people avoid the metal grates for fear of snapping off a heel or accidentally dropping something valuable into the abyss below. Some grates cover recesses 10 or 15 feet deep, while others conceal voids that can go down some eight stories.

Wallace Collins wasn’t worrying about the grates when he headed out on errands and then to a lunch meeting near his apartment on East 39th Street and 2nd Avenue recently. The businessman was distracted and juggling papers when his wedding band slipped off his finger, bounced on the sidewalk and rolled toward a sidewalk grate.

“I was thinking three blocks ahead to where I had to be and I guess I was fiddling around with the papers I had in my hand, thinking ‘Does the mail come first, or the bank on the corner? I gotta put that slip on top,'” Collins told NBC 4 New York.

Collins described how the tragic scene played out…

“It rolled along the sidewalk and it was kind of like a slow-motion,” he told NBC 4 New York.

He also recalled recognizing the precious jewelry heading toward the grate and saying to himself, “Wait, that’s my ring!”

Collins made a headlong dive to save the ring, but it found a gap in the grate and landed about 15 feet below.

“For a split-second I thought, ‘Oh I can get it,’ and then it fell through,” he said.

Collins told his story to a doorman of the nearby building and then to a police officer. They suggested he call 311, which is a phone number many cities support for non-emergency issues. That didn’t work, so the next step was to call Con Edison, the utility provider.

A Con Ed customer service rep told Collins that she couldn’t send out a crew right away because his situation wasn’t an emergency. She did, however, promise to “get to it when we can.”

Day after day, Collins would pass over the grate and peer down to make sure the ring was still there.

“I knew it was safe where it was until someone came to get it,” he said.

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Finally, last Wednesday, a week after his call to Con Ed, a team from the utility was sent to rescue the ring. On hand to witness the operation was Collins, who can be seen pointing to the spot where he knew the ring to be.

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A few minutes after flipping open the grate and heading down with a ladder, a Con Ed worker emerged with the ring and handed it to Collins.

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“Whoa, there we go!” exclaimed Collins. “Back where it belongs.”

Collins slipped the ring back on his finger and modeled it for the NBC 4 New York camera.

He thanked the Con Edison workers and promised to be more careful in the future — especially while walking over New York City’s sidewalk grates.

“I’ll always be paranoid about it now,” he told NBC 4 New York.

Source: Screen captures via nbcnewyork.com.

Music Friday: ‘The Joy’s in the Ride’ Reads the Inscription of Amanda Marshall’s Locket in Her 1995 Hit, ‘Dark Horse

Welcome to Music Friday when we bring you hit songs with jewelry, gemstones or precious metals in the title or lyrics. Today, Canadian songstress Amanda Marshall throws caution to the wind while wearing a very special locket in her 1995 chart-topper, “Dark Horse.”

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In the song she co-wrote with Dean McTaggart and David Tyson, Marshall tells the story of a 19-year-old girl who enters into a whirlwind romance with the new guy in town. She’s criticized for being a crazy, romantic fool, but Marshall’s heart tells her that this could be “the lucky one.” Despite the long odds, she’s willing to put her money on this “dark horse.”

She sings, “I wear your locket, our picture’s inside / Inscription says ‘the joy’s in the ride’ / And I believe / That something so sacred / Is something worth this kind of fight / Cause love knows no patience / You can’t please everyone all the time.”

“Dark Horse” appeared as the fourth track from Marshall’s wildly successful self-titled debut album, which sold more than one million copies in Canada alone. The single peaked at #5 on Canada’s RPM Top Singles chart and #1 on RPM‘s Adult Contemporary chart.

Interestingly, while appearing on The Rosie O’Donnell Show in 1995, Elton John commented that he was listening to Marshall’s just-released album and that “Dark Horse” would be a “guaranteed hit.”

Born in Toronto in 1972, Amanda Meta Marshall studied music extensively during her childhood and her talents yielded her a spot at the Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto. While performing on the Queen Street West bar scene in her teens, she met Canadian jazz and blues-rock guitarist Jeff Healey, who was impressed by her powerful voice. She eventually toured with Healey and then released her debut album a few years later. It was a monumental work that spawned six Top 40 hits.

A year later, in 1996, her song “This Could Take All Night” was included in the original soundtrack of the motion picture Tin Cup, and, in 1997, Marshall’s “I’ll Be Okay” was featured on the original soundtrack of My Best Friend’s Wedding.

Although Marshall has an active Facebook fan page, the artist has not performed since 2010. Her followers regularly encourage Marshall to return to the music scene.

Please check out the official video for Marshall’s “Dark Horse.” The lyrics are below if you’d like to sing along.

“Dark Horse”
Written by Dean McTaggart, David Tyson and Amanda Marshall. Performed by Amanda Marshall.

Indian summer
Abilene
You were new in town, I was nineteen
And sparks flew
They called us crazy behind our backs
“Romantic fools” we just let them laugh
Because we knew
It may be a long shot
We may get lonely down the line
But love knows no reason
And I won’t let ’em make up my mind

My money’s riding on this dark horse, baby
My heart is saying it’s the lucky one
And it’s true color’s gonna shine through someday
If we let this, let this dark horse run

The stars are brighter in the desert sky
No need to wonder or justify
Where this will lead
I wear your locket, our picture’s inside
Inscription says ‘the joy’s in the ride’
And I believe
That something so sacred
Is something worth this kind of fight
Cause love knows no patience
You can’t please everyone all the time

My money’s riding on this dark horse, baby
My heart is saying it’s the lucky one
And it’s true color’s gonna shine through someday
If we let this, let this dark horse run

So rare
So sweet
Together baby, I know
We can
Disappear
Be free

My money’s riding on this dark horse, baby
My heart is saying it’s the lucky one
And it’s true color’s gonna shine through someday
If we let this, let this dark horse run
My money’s riding on this dark horse, baby
My heart is saying it’s the lucky one
And it’s true color’s gonna shine through someday
If we let this, let this dark horse run

Indian summer
Abilene
You were new in town, I was nineteen

Credit: Screen capture via YouTube.com.

Viral Kiss Cam Video Showing Fan Dropping Ring During Marriage Proposal Is Exposed as a Hoax

A viral Kiss Cam video allegedly showing a fan proposing to his girlfriend during Saturday’s Atlanta Hawks basketball game — but then dropping the ring — has been exposed as a hoax by the team’s beat writer.

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In the 95-second video posted by the team, a bunch of handsome couples are gladly taking part in the Kiss Cam ritual — a fun diversion often seen on the Jumbotron during breaks in the action. After the last couple obliges the camera with a kiss, the young man takes advantage of the moment by getting down on one knee to propose to his girlfriend.

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He presents her with with a diamond ring, but just as she’s about to say “Yes,” another fan congratulates the suitor with a jarring slap on the back. The ring goes flying and disappears under the seats.

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The video ends with the future bride-to-be threatening to slug the guy who caused the fumble and a bunch of fans in the section scrambling to find the ring.

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On Saturday night, the Atlanta Hawks published the video on YouTube.com with the following caption: “A fan tried to propose to his girlfriend at our game on Saturday, but it all went wrong when he dropped the ring.” The next afternoon, the Hawks posted the same video to its Twitter account.

The video quickly went viral, with media outlets around the world jumping on the story. The video on YouTube.com garnered more than 300,000 views.

Some YouTube and Twitter users were quick to point out that the video seemed staged, that the Kiss Cam participants seemed to be acting, especially in the last scene with the lost ring.

Those suspicions were confirmed on Monday when Atlanta Hawks beat writer Chris Vivlamore of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution took to Twitter to shed some light on the story.

“To the many — including several outlets — this is FAKE,” he wrote. “It’s a bit that runs often during games. Any contrary thoughts or info is false.”

Those in the know pointed to the fact that pre-recorded Kiss Cam skits have been used by the team frequently over the past 10 years. They also noted that leveled camera angle, pre-2016 Hawks gear and bad acting should have all been giveaways.

Even though the Hawks’ Kiss Cam proposal was likely staged, the in-game proposal we covered in late September was very real. You may remember the surreal engagement ring fumble caught live on the Jumbotron at Yankees Stadium. It was also broadcast in real time on ESPN and the YES Network. After about five heart-thumping minutes, the bride-to-be finally spotted the ring in the cuff of her blue jeans.

Check out the Atlanta Hawks’ video below, and see if you agree that the vignettes seem staged…

Credits: Screen captures via YouTube.com.

Fender’s Senior Master Builder Yuriy Shishkov Unveils Custom Guitar Inlaid With 1,000 Diamonds

A custom Fender Stratocaster guitar inlaid with 1,000 diamonds was one of the biggest draws at last weekend’s National Association of Music Merchants (NAMM) trade show in Anaheim, Calif.

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Conceived by senior master builder Yuriy Shishkov, the Art Deco-inspired design celebrates the 30th anniversary of the Fender Custom Shop.

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The guitar includes 423 diamonds on the front, 462 on the back and 115 at the top. It has a glistening sterling silver body that complements the red enamel guilloche inlay of the dramatic fretboard.

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As a special touch, Shishkov added rubies to the side dots. Shishkov did not, however, cite the total weight of the gemstones used in the design nor the guitar’s estimated value.

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Shishkov explained that the 30th anniversary guitar was inspired by the Art Deco lines of the 1936 Kodak Bantam Special camera, which was the vision of famous industrial designer Walter Dorwin Teague. Kodak distributed the Bantam Special from 1936 to 1948, and the camera has since earned a reputation for being one of the most beautifully designed cameras ever made.

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Fender’s senior master builder is calling his one-of-a-kind, diamond-embellished guitar the Fender Studioliner Stratocaster.

“I wanted to connect the two objects together — the guitar and photo camera,” said Shishkov. “For that reason it’s actually called Studioliner [to represent the] photo studio and recording studio.”

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The guitar, which is gorgeous from every angle, is a reflection of the craftsmanship, artistry and attention to detail that has earned Fender’s Custom Shop worldwide acclaim.

A native of the former Soviet Union, Shishkov is considered one of the last of the renaissance guitar builders. He handcrafts many of his own woodworking tools and is known for custom inlay work. Shishkov arrived in the U.S. in 1990 and settled in the Chicago area, where he collaborated with the likes of guitarists Jimmy Page and Robert Plant of Led Zeppelin, Robin Zander of Cheap Trick and Paul Stanley of Kiss. Shishkov joined the Fender Custom Shop’s Master Builder team in 2000.

The 2017 Winter NAMM show, which its organizers describe as “the world’s largest trade-only event for the music products industry,” is a magnet for famous musicians, who often attend the show to promote their own signature models and equipment.

Credits: Screen captures via fender.com.

Former Marine Loses Engagement Ring and Then Gets It Back, Thanks to TV Station and Facebook

The love story of former Marine Daniel Frye and girlfriend Lauren Williams has all the trappings of a Hollywood blockbuster.

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Frye, who had served two tours in Afghanistan, credited Williams with saving his life as he struggled to recover from post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

“When I got out of the Marine Corps, I went through some dark years,” Frye told NBC affiliate WCNC. “I went through so many jobs. I’ve slept in cars.”

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After meeting Williams, his life turned around. With a new job as a welder and new inspiration from the love of his life, he saved up for months to buy the perfect engagement ring. Then he planned a trip on January 7 to a place Williams always dreamed of visiting, the Biltmore Estate in Asheville, N.C., where he would pop the question. He even invited Williams’ parents to Asheville to surprise their daughter, and he hired a photographer to document all the romantic festivities.

What Frye didn’t anticipate, however, was that the ring box that he had hidden in his pocket would somehow fall out on the Biltmore Estate shuttle bus and end up in the baggage of a widow heading back to Athens, Ga.

Imagine Frye’s horror when he went down on one knee, reached into his pocket and realized the $5,000 ring was gone.

“I looked over and saw complete panic on his face,” Williams, 25, told People. “I saw him reaching in every pocket and it just clicked. I knew right then he’d been planning on asking me and that the ring was gone. I just knew.”

Said Frye, “I felt terrible. I just felt terrible.”

The couple filed a police report and retraced every step, but the ring could not be found.

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After a week and a half, the couple from Rock Hill, S.C., told their heart-wrenching story to WCNC. In recounting their plight, the couple was brought to tears. On January 18, the story ran on the Charlotte affiliate’s nightly news show and appeared as a feature on its website and Facebook page.

One day later, a widow from Athens, Ga., saw the story on Facebook and came forward with the ring.

“I had been getting on the bus and my arms were full of bags, and a man thought I’d dropped something and threw it in my bag,” the anonymous woman told People. “At the time I didn’t look to see what it was. Then I was going through my bags and saw the ring box.”

The woman tracked down Williams on Facebook and Fry immediately got in his car and trekked six hours to retrieve the ring.

“He must have hugged me 10 times,” the widow said. “I was just happy to make sure the rightful owner got it.”

When the 29-year-old Frye returned home, he was ready to complete the marriage proposal he had started 12 days earlier.

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“This isn’t how we dreamed, obviously,” Frye says in a video posted to Williams’ Facebook page, “but this whole thing showed me so much more about you and that I want to marry you even more. And I want to ask you if you would be my wife for the rest of my life.”

Williams exclaims, “Yes,” and the couple embraces.

“Now let me put it on you,” Frye says, as he slips the ring onto her finger.

Williams can barely contain her excitement as she stares at the ring. “Thank you, God,” she says.

“So much blood, sweat and tears went into that ring,” Williams told People. “It’s a full-blown miracle that we got it back. What are the chances? What are the odds?”

Credits: Images via Facebook/Lauren Williams; Screen capture via WCNC.com; Ring photo provided by Daniel Frye and Lauren Williams.

Backstage Worker at CMA Awards Pockets Beyoncé’s 13.73-Carat Diamond Thinking It’s a Worthless Prop

A backstage worker at the 50th Annual CMA Awards in Nashville in November found a pretty pear-shaped stone sitting on top of a band cart and dropped it in his pocket, reasoning that it was merely a worthless prop.

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The “prop” turned out to be a 13.73-carat colored diamond that had come loose from a ring worn by Beyoncé after her show-stopping performance with the Dixie Chicks. The gem had been borrowed from designer Lorraine Schwartz and was said to be worth “hundreds of thousands of dollars.”

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Even though the show’s organizers alerted many members of the stage crew about the missing diamond and spearheaded a frantic search, Jesus Lopez was not aware of the loss and went about his normal routine of unloading band carts at the Bridgestone Arena — with the gem safely tucked in his pants pocket. After the show, he gifted the stone to his wife.

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“I’ve been doing CMA for the last 12 years, and I have seen a lot of different jewelry, fake jewelry, rhinestones,” Lopez told Nashville’s News Channel 5. “I gave it to my wife thinking, of course, it was a rhinestone.”

On the day after the show, Lopez’s son, who also was a member of the stage crew and had heard rumblings about the lost gemstone, told his dad, “Do you know what you found? You found Beyoncé’s diamond.”

Lopez knew that the right thing to do was to return the gem to its rightful owner, but he hoped that his granddaughter might benefit from his honesty.

“When I heard it was Beyoncé, I said, ‘Well, maybe my granddaughter can meet Beyoncé and give it to her herself,'” Lopez told Nashville’s News Channel 5.

Lopez soon learned that the diamond had been on loan from Schwartz and that the diamond had to be returned to the designer. A meeting with the singer was not in the cards. Schwartz’s representative picked up the diamond from Lopez and presented him with an undisclosed reward.

Lopez told a reporter that he still held out hope that his granddaughter could meet Beyoncé one day, but even if she doesn’t he’s pleased that the valuable diamond was able to find it’s way back to its rightful owner instead of being lost or thrown away.

Credits: Screen captures via YouTube.com; Newschannel5.com.

Music Friday: Chance Encounter Results in a Marriage Proposal in Brad Paisley’s ‘We Danced’

Welcome to Music Friday when we bring you chart-topping songs with jewelry, gemstones or precious metals in the title or lyrics. Today, a chance after-hours encounter between a bar owner and a patron results in a marriage proposal in Brad Paisley’s country hit “We Danced.”

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In the song written by Paisley and Charles Dubois, the narrator is a bar owner who is cleaning up after closing time. A woman, who had been in the bar earlier that evening, has returned to retrieve a misplaced purse. The two get lost in conversation, and the bar owner insists that the only way he’ll return the purse he had found earlier is if she agrees to dance with him.

With the chairs up and the lights turned down, the coupled danced — and instantly fell in love.

Paisley sings, “And from that moment, there was never any doubt / I had found the one that I had always dreamed about / And then one evenin’, when she stopped by after work / I pulled a diamond ring out of the pocket of my shirt.”

In a fun twist, the woman says she’ll marry him under one condition — that he agrees to dance with her.

“We Danced” was the fourth and final single from the 44-year-old singer-songwriter’s wildly successful 1999 debut album Who Needs Pictures. The song went to #1 on the U.S. Billboard Hot Country Songs chart and was nominated for Song of the Year at the Academy of Country Music Awards.

That album helped launch a stellar career that claimed 32 top-10 singles on the US Billboard Country Airplay chart, 19 of which have reached #1. Paisley has sold more than 12 million albums, won three Grammy Awards, 14 Academy of Country Music Awards, 14 Country Music Association Awards and two American Music Awards. At the age of 28, he became the youngest artist ever to be inducted into the Grand Ole Opry.

A West Virginia native, Bradley Douglas “Brad” Paisley was introduced to country music by his grandfather, Warren Jarvis, who gave the eight-year-old his first guitar, a Sears Danelectro Silvertone. Jarvis taught his grandson to play, and by the age of 10 Paisley was already performing at his church.

While in junior high, Paisley was doing a show at a local Rotary Club, when he was discovered by a program director for a Wheeling, West Virginia, radio station. He was invited to be a guest on the popular radio show “Wheeling Jamboree” and the rest is history.

Please check out the audio track of Paisley’s “We Danced.” The lyrics are below if you’d like to sing along…

“We Danced”
Written by Brad Paisley and Charles Dubois. Performed by Brad Paisley.

The bar was empty, I was sweeping up the floor
That’s when she walked in, I said, “I’m sorry but we’re closed”
And she said “I know but I’m afraid I left my purse”
I said, “I put one back behind the bar, I bet it’s probably yours”

And the next thing that I knew
There we were, lost in conversation
And before I handed her her purse
I said, “You’ll only get this back on one condition”

And we danced
Out there on that empty hardwood floor
The chairs up and the lights turned way down low
The music played, we held each other close

And we danced

And from that moment, there was never any doubt

I had found the one that I had always dreamed about

And then one evenin’, when she stopped by after work

I pulled a diamond ring out of the pocket of my shirt
And as her eyes filled up with tears
She said, “This is the last thing I expected”
And then she took me by the hand
And said, “I’ll only marry you on one condition”

And we danced
Out there on that empty hardwood floor
The chairs up and the lights turned way down low
The music played, we held each other close

And we danced
Like no one else had ever danced before
I can’t explain what happened on that floor
But the music played, we held each other close
And we danced, yeah, we danced

Credit: Photo by minds-eye (Brad Paisley) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons.

887-Carat ‘La Gloria’ Emerald to Headline Guernsey’s NYC Auction of the Marcial de Gomar Collection

An extraordinary 887-carat rough emerald dubbed “La Gloria” will headline Guernsey’s auction of the Marcial de Gomar Collection on April 12 in New York City.

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“La Gloria,” which is said to be the largest Muzo rough emerald in North America, carries a preliminary estimate of $4 to $5 million and is part of a 2,000-carat collection that is expected to yield a total of $15 million to $20 million.

Included in the group are more than 20 loose emeralds — both faceted and rough — as well as 13 pieces of emerald jewelry. The museum-quality emeralds were collected by gem expert Manuel Marcial de Gomar during his 62-year career spent in the U.S. and in the jungles of Columbia, specifically at the Muzo mines, which are famous for yielding the world’s finest emeralds.

Emeralds from this mine are known for their legendary saturation and hue. In fact, “Muzo Green” is often the yardstick by which all other emeralds are judged.

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Along with “La Gloria,” the auction house is spotlighting the “Tears of Fura,” a matched pair of teardrop-shaped Muzo emeralds, and the “Marcial de Gomar Star,” a rare double-sided star emerald.

The “Tears of Fura” have a combined total weight of 95.51 carats and a preliminary estimate of $3 million to $4 million. The name of the stones honors the two Colombian mountain peaks of Fura and Tena, which were considered sacred by the Muzo people. They believed Fura and Tena were the parents of humanity and legend states that the tears of Fura became emeralds and butterflies.

The “Marcial de Gomar Star” weighs 25.86 carats and is the largest of only 11 star emeralds known to exist. It displays a six-rayed star that is visible from both sides. (The auction house noted that this may be the first known double-sided star emerald). The gem’s preliminary estimate is $2 million to $3 million.

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Marcial de Gomar’s firsthand knowledge and experience with rare emeralds, including shipwreck-origin emeralds, has placed him in demand as an author, lecturer and consultant. He is also the founder of Emeralds International, LLC.

Decades ago, Marcial de Gomar befriended Mel Fisher, the treasure hunter best known for his work with the sunken Spanish galleon Nuestra Señora de Atocha. Several Muzo emeralds and rare gold coins from the Atocha passed into the Marcial de Gomar Collection and will be included at the Guernsey event.

The auction will be conducted live at the Americas Society at 680 Park Avenue with online bidding at http://www.liveauctioneers.com.

Credit: Images courtesy of Guernsey’s.